.

.
 

Top Music Distribution Companies Breakdown

This video above was created by You tuber and digital music marketing expert Shawn Folk from the blog Payusnomind.info. I interviewed Shawn a while back for the mixtape marketing podcast episode 12 where we briefly discussed Digital Distribution Sites. Since then Shawn has created this amazing video where he has broken down each digital distribution site with their pros and cons. Below I broke down the video for this blog in the hope that it would prove useful to the readers of my blog. If you want to see Shawn’s Blog post on his video on music distribution companies check out this article here:  Click Here  

 

Please Note That These Music Distribution Sites will change their price and services over time. Always do your own research before you join one of these companies. If you have found a fault with this report please hit the contact button so that I can make the changes to the article.

 

Digital Music Distribution Sites

Music Distribution Companies

CD Baby vs. Tunecore vs. Songcast vs. Onerpm vs. DistroKid. Now, this is a comparison video with these digital distribution sites and music distribution companies. Now what we are going to look at and comparing them on is price, the percentage sales they take, whether they give you an ISRC code, which is a code used within YouTube where when your album or song is in a video, it puts a link at the bottom of that video with the thumbnail of your album and the link to iTunes or Amazon where people can click that link and buy it. And A UPC barcode which tracks sales and sounds.

 

We gonna look at how they pay you, how they get you your money. We gonna look at their reputation, how people feel about them and how they satisfy people with their service. We gonna look at what extras they give you and the price that they charge you.

 

Now the first thing that we gonna look at is the price. One rpm charges you $40 to distribute an album. $15 to distribute a single and they also allow you to pay $5 per store if you wanna get your album to iTunes and Amazon. If you wanna distribute your album to these stores and you don’t really care about all the other stores, you got to pay $10 to distribute your album to those stores, specifically. And they also have an option of distributing your music to the streaming platforms for free.

 


Songcast
will add you music to Itunes and all the big music distribution sites. There are no contracts, they give out 100% of your royalties also they have some bonus like a Facebook music page tab and Itunes digital sales statistics. They charge a monthly fee of $5.99 and $19.99 per album upload. This monthly fee stays the same no matter of how many songs you have submitted to the site. Have more than 9 albums, you will still only have to pay $5.99 per month.

 

CD Baby charges you $60 per album and $15 per single. Tunecore charges you $50 per album per year. It’s an annual fee. Every year, you gotta pay them $50 for every album that you distribute through them. $10 per single, same thing. It’s an annual fee. Every year, you gotta pay them $10 for every single that you distribute to them. DistroKid charges $20 annually for unlimited releases, which means you can release a hundred records under them in a year and it will still cost you $20. 

 

When you look at the percentage sales they take, Onerpm takes 15 percent of your royalties, but they allow you to pay $30 as an annual fee and keep 100 percent of your royalties. CD Baby takes 9 percent of your royalties. Tunecore and DistroKid allow you to keep 100 percent of your royalties. They don’t take anything from you.

 

Now when you look at whether they give you an ISRC code and UPC code, Onerpm gives you an ISRC code and UPC for free. CD Baby gives you ISRC free, but they charge you $20 for the UPC code for an album and $5 for UPC code for a single. And they make it mandatory that you have to have a UPC barcode for digital distribution through them, so it’s a requirement so it drives their prices up from the $60 that they say they charge actually to $80 when you include the UPC barcode. So, it’s $80 for an album and $20 for a single.

 

Now both TuneCore and DistroKid give you the ISRC code and the UPC code for free as well. DistroKid gives you the UPC code for free, but to get the ISRC code, you have to upgrade to a Musician Plus plan, which is $35 annually and not 20. So in order to get an ISRC code, you got to pay them $35 annually.

 

Now, when you look at how they give you your money, everybody on this list distributes payment through PayPal. But only CD Baby and Tunecore allow you to receive your money through direct deposit, which is great because when you receive your money through Paypal, you have to wait for the digital distributor to send your money to PayPal and you have to wait to get your money from PayPal to your bank account. One rpm allows you to take your money whether there’s a $10, it doesn’t matter.

 

If you have money in your Onerpm account, you can take it out, no minimum balance that you have to reach. CD Baby requires that you have at least $10 in your account to withdraw your funds. TuneCore allows you to withdraw your balance at any amount. Only CD Baby has a requirement before you can withdraw your funds.

When you look at their reputation. I don’t have anything bad to say about them. CD Baby, same thing. There’s nothing bad to say about them. Tunecore, I put their reputation at 80 percent. There were a lot of complaints about them, not particularly about their service but their YouTube program and other issues. DistroKid, I put their approval rating at a 100 percent as well because there are no complaints about them. Nobody is complaining about their service of online music distribution.

When you look at the extras they give you, Onerpm provides you with a marketing support where if you have a notable writeup or you’ve got a certain amount of sales, they’re with you to get a priority placement in digital music stores like iTunes and Amazon to get you a feature. They also have a multichannel network, which is like a YouTube label that you can sign and become a part of. All these other digital distributors with the exception of the DistroKid have a YouTube licensing program.

 

Now in addition to having a multichannel network, Onerpm has a free video production studio that they allow artists in their multichannel network program to create high-quality videos using 4D cameras. You can make high-quality videos on your YouTube channel. They have quality customer service. I deal with them and I have albums distributed through them. They are very accommodating. CD Baby does physical distribution. In exchange, they take $4 in every sale, no matter how much sales your album has. They also offer a direct to an option. They also have quality customer service. And also, they are also very accommodating.

 

Tunecore doesn’t really do much outside digital distribution for the price that they charge you. They do other things, but it’s a separate charge. But they have high-quality customer service too. DistroKid, their customer service is completely automated, they use computers. You’re not really dealing with real people.

 

So, they’re very limited in what they can do and what they can help you with. When it comes to the price you pay in distributing an album, Tunecore requires you to pay $150 for 3 albums in one year and every year after that. DistroKid only requires you $35 to release 3 albums per year. One rpm doesn’t charge you with anything, but they take 15 percent of your sales. CD Baby requires you to spend $180 for 3 albums in a year.

hip hop blogs list header banner

 

The Pros and Cons Of Online Music Distribution Sites

 

TuneCore: Pro’s and Cons

tunecoreTunecore charges you $50 per album per year. It’s an annual fee. Every year, you gotta pay them $50 for every album that you distribute through them. $10 per single, same thing. It’s an annual fee. Every year, you gotta pay them $10 for every single that you distribute to them.

TuneCore allows you to keep 100 percent of your royalties. They don’t take anything from you. TuneCore gives you the ISRC code and the UPC code for free as well. I put their reputation at 80 percent there was a lot of complaints about them, not particularly about their service but their YouTube program and other issues. Tunecore doesn’t really do much outside digital distribution compared to the other music distribution companies mentioned here in the blog,  for the price that they charge you. They do other things, but it’s a separate charge. But they have high-quality customer service too.

 

 

Songcast Pros and Cons

songcast

Songcast has a monthly fee of $5.99 per month. They also charge $19.99 per album upload with the first one being free. This monthly stays at $5.99 no matter how much content you upload. They pay out a 100% of your royalties and they also don’t charge recurring album fees. Like some of the other music distribution companies do. Songcast has some other options like your own Facebook Music Page Tab and Itunes sales reports. They also don’t charge you to remove your music from these distribution sites. Songcast is one along with cd baby is one of the more popular music distribution companies for independent artists. 

 

 

One rpm : Pro’s and Cons

 

 

one rpmOne rpm: Now the first thing that we gonna look at is the price. One rpm charges you $40 to distribute an album. $15 to distribute a single and they also allow you to pay $5 per store if you wanna get your album to iTunes and Amazon.

And they also have an option of distributing your music to the streaming platforms for free. They don’t charge you to get your music into Spotify, Rhapsody, Google Music. None of those streaming platforms will they charge you to distribute your music into. You can distribute your music in there for free.
When you look at the percentage sales they take, Onerpm takes 15 percent of your royalties, but they allow you to pay $30 as an annual fee and keep 100 percent of your royalties.
Now when you look at whether they give you an ISRC code and UPC code, Onerpm gives you an ISRC code and UPC for free.

When you look at their reputation, I give Onerpm a 100 percent because I deal with them. I don’t have anything bad to say about them.When you look at the extras they give you, Onerpm provides you with a marketing support where if you have a notable writeup or you’ve got a certain amount of sales, they’re with you to get a priority placement in digital music stores like iTunes and Amazon to get you a feature.

 

They also have a multichannel network, which is like a YouTube label that you can sign to and become a part of. All these other digital distributors with the exception of the DistroKid have a YouTube licensing program.
Now in addition to having a multichannel network, Onerpm has a free video production studio that they allow artists in their multichannel network program to create high-quality videos using 4D cameras. You can make high-quality videos on your YouTube channel. They have quality customer service. I deal with them and I have albums distributed through them. They are very accommodating. One rpm is one of the main music distribution sites that Shawn Folk mentions that he uses in the above video 
CD Baby: Pro’s and Cons

 

cd babyCD Baby charges you $60 per album and $15 per single. They take 9 percent of your royalties. CD Baby gives you ISRC free, but they charge you $20 for the UPC code for an album and $5 for UPC code for a single.
And they make it mandatory that you have to have a UPC barcode for digital distribution through them, so it’s a requirement so it drives their prices up from the $60 that they say they charge actually to $80 when you include the UPC barcode. So, it’s $80 for an album and $20 for a single. CD Baby has 100 percent approval rating.

There’s nothing bad to say about them. CD Baby does physical distribution. In exchange, they take $4 in every sale, no matter how much sales your album has. They also offer a direct to fan option. They also have quality customer service. And also, they are also very accommodating
DistroKid: Pro’s and Cons

 

distrokidDistroKid charges $20 annually for unlimited releases, which means you can release a hundred records under them in a year and it will still cost you $20. DistroKid allows you to keep 100 percent of your royalties. Like the other music distribution companies, they submit music to similar streaming sites. 

They don’t take anything from you.DistroKid gives you the ISRC code and the UPC code for free as well. DistroKid gives you the UPC code for free, but to get the ISRC code, you have to upgrade to a Musician Plus plan, which is $35 annually and not 20.

 

So in order to get an ISRC code, you got to pay them $35 annually. DistroKid, I put their approval rating at a 100 percent as well because there are no complaints about them. Nobody is complaining about their service. DistroKid, their customer service is completely automated, they use computers. You’re not really dealing with real people. So, they’re very limited in what they can do and what they can help you with.

 

Now, when you look at how they give you your money, everybody on this list distributes payment through PayPal. But only CD Baby and Tunecore allow you to receive your money through direct deposit, which is great because when you receive your money through Paypal, you have to wait for the digital distributor to send your money to PayPal and you have to wait to get your money from PayPal to your bank account.

 

One rpm allows you to take your money whether there’s a $10, it doesn’t matter. If you have money in your Onerpm account, you can take it out, no minimum balance that you have to reach. CD Baby requires that you have at least $10 in your account to withdraw your funds. TuneCore allows you to withdraw your balance at any amount. Only CD Baby has a requirement before you can withdraw your funds.

 

When it comes to the price you pay in distributing an album, Tunecore requires you to pay $150 for 3 albums in one year and every year after that. DistroKid only requires you $35 to release 3 albums per year. Onerpm doesn’t charge you with anything, but they take 15 percent of your sales. CD Baby requires you to spend $180 for 3 albums in a year.

 

 

 SEARCH   .